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Photo Friday: Macabre Corridor

I am two classes in to my first photography class. After years of taking pictures through trial-and-error, I decided it was finally time to really learn the settings.

My camera has an awful lot of buttons that I'm afraid to touch lest I break something. Deciding there is no time like the present, I signed up for a summer course at my local community college.

This week was our first lab. We did a photo shoot on the campus. Mind you, we haven't actually learned any of the settings yet. We shot in manual mode, changing apertures and shutter speeds to our hearts content (keeping the ISO at 400 per the teacher's instructions).

So how did it go? Well, my first shot came out completely black. The good news is it can only go up from there.

When it was my turn to work with the teacher I selected a fountain as my subject. It had a trash can in the background off to the side. My teacher suggested a couple of angles. I went for straight on in a way that let me keep the trash can just out of view. Her response was, "you're difficult, aren't you?"

Not sure if she was kidding or not I laughed it off. After a couple of shots she said, "you like taking weird shots, right?"

Um... I like to think of them as creative, inspired, original at worst. But weird works too, I guess. I said yes and asked if that was a bad thing. She said, "there's one in every class."

With that established she led me over to one end of a long outdoor corridor. Never one to be mistaken for graceful, I ran into her when she stopped and stepped on her foot. Thank goodness this is a non-credit course.

Anyhow, this Friday's photo is one of the corridor shots. The evening time and overcast weather lent to an overall macabre feeling which I rather like. Call me weird (obviously it won't be a first), but the tragic lighting works for me.

Happy Friday from a one-of-a-kind, weird, ungraceful budding photographer!

[caption id="attachment_689" align="aligncenter" width="477" caption="Dark outdoor corridor"]Dark outdoor corridor[/caption]

Camera settings: ISO 400, f3.5, shutter 30.

Comments

  1. That's a very steady shot considering you were using a shutter speed of 1/30. Nice result with those muted tones. It would do well in this group http://www.flickr.com/groups/parallax/

    btw, what kind of camera are you using?

    ReplyDelete
  2. I was told I was "funny" more than once. I used to ask if they meant Haha funny or weird funny. Not any more. ;) :D

    ReplyDelete
  3. J. - I'm using a Nikon D40x. My teacher showed me how to brace the camera against one of the columns to keep the camera steady for that shot. It was a great tip!

    Paula - Nice tactic! Glad you don't get called funny anymore.

    ReplyDelete
  4. it's not weird...it's artistic. dammit!!! LOL

    ReplyDelete

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