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Reclaiming My Space (the space that is mine, not the social networking site)

[caption id="attachment_824" align="alignleft" width="300" caption="My bulletin board after the clean-up"]My bulletin board after the clean-up[/caption]

My recent efforts to reclaim my time have also become activities in reclaiming my space.

Over the past two weeks I have reclaimed my deck, a path through the garage, and my bulletin board. Little things really. Each one, however, gave my soul a little boost.

My deck felt ugly and cramped. In a roughly 6x8' space, there were four chairs, an animal hideout, and a flower pot half-filled with soil growing weeds. It was cramped and made me think "ugh" every time I walked by the sliding glass door.

In one evening, I pushed all the chairs into an orderly fashion against the deck rails (cornering in the animal house to conceal it a bit) planted flowers in the pot, and added 5 more flower pots.

Now I walk by and think "pretty." It's on it's way to becoming a deck I love. It's still too small for both a table AND chairs which I would love to have. Instead I think I may one day replace the stiff chairs with a small outdoor loveseat. What a great space that would be!

The garage is filled with various boxes of things, construction supplies, tools, and other odds and ends.

Tackling the garage is a big project, though. Every time I thought about cleaning it, I decided I didn't have the time or the energy. So I started by just breaking down the empty boxes and taking them out for recycling. There were a lot. (Let's just say the boxes at the top of the stack were from Christmas.)

Now there is a path through the garage. Room to move without twisting and tip-toeing. It's a good start.

My desk in my home office was feeling cluttered and I couldn't figure out why. I had recently organized it, but I still felt stressed whenever I sat there.

Then I realized how overburdened my magnetic bulletin board was. There were various schedules, phone numbers, and a collection of things that individually made me happy (magnetic poetry, cards, pictures, etc.). As a group it was overwhelming.

I took everything off and put back only the things I wanted to look at right now. Everything else went somewhere else. The whole desk area is now more appealing because of the small bulletin board clean-up.

In 15 minutes here and 30 minutes there I am reclaiming my space, one little nook at a time. It's amazing what a big effect such small tasks can have on my serenity.

Comments

  1. Wow, Sherri, I love this. Thank you for showing us how it's done. Every little bit counts and you've given me ideas. I'm grateful! What comes to mind is how much I don't see, because I don't want to look there because I don't like what's there. What if I looked and then gently made it mine? Love that.

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  2. Nice. I've been doing this as well. Even if it's a transient space. Like when I chose to camp out at the kitchen table with my laptop where it was sunny, rather than at my desk in a dark downstairs corner. I cleared off the table, cut a small bouquet of roses, lit some incense and worked quite happily there all day.

    I intend to write about this too (with photos! :)

    It makes a huge difference (even a little at a time) doesn't it?

    ReplyDelete
  3. it's amazing to me what a shift happens when I clear out even a small space. I'm happy you are getting your space back!!

    ReplyDelete

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